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UK [ˈæktʃuəlɪ] / US adverb
1) used for emphasizing what is really true or what really happened

I need to talk to the person who actually made the application.

We've spoken on the phone but we've never actually met.

There's a big difference between saying you'll do something and actually doing it.

2) used for emphasizing that something is surprising

It looks as if Tony is actually doing some work.

Some patients actually got worse after receiving the treatment.

3) spoken used when correcting what someone has said or thinks, or what you yourself have said

He's actually very helpful.

I don't think they'd let us, actually.

It was yesterday, no actually it was Monday morning.

4) spoken used for admitting something

"Did you spend much money?" "Well, yes. Quite a lot, actually."


English dictionary. 2014.

Look at other dictionaries:

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  • Actually — puede referirse a: La palabra de la lengua inglesa traducible por de hecho o realmente , aunque es muy frecuente su errónea traducción por el faux ami actualmente. Expresiones usadas en ciencias políticas: Actually existing socialism (socialismo… …   Wikipedia Español

  • actually — is one of a number of words, like definitely, really, surely, etc., which are used freely as emphasizers, either in relation to words or phrases • (Often it wasn t actually a railway station but a special stopping place in the middle of nowhere… …   Modern English usage

  • Actually — Ac tu*al*ly, adv. 1. Actively. [Obs.] Neither actually . . . nor passively. Fuller. [1913 Webster] 2. In act or in fact; really; in truth; positively. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • actually — index de facto Burton s Legal Thesaurus. William C. Burton. 2006 …   Law dictionary

  • actually — (adv.) early 15c., in fact, in reality (as opposed to in possibility), from ACTUAL (Cf. actual) + LY (Cf. ly) (2). Meaning actively, vigorously is from mid 15c.; that of at this time, at present is from 1660s. As an intensive added to a statement …   Etymology dictionary

  • actually — [adj] truly real, existent absolutely, as a matter of fact, de facto, genuinely, indeed, in fact, in point of fact, in reality, in truth, literally, really, veritably, very; concept 582 …   New thesaurus

  • actually — ► ADVERB 1) as the truth or facts of a situation. 2) as a matter of fact; even …   English terms dictionary

  • actually — [ak′cho͞o əl ē, ak′sho͞oəl ē; ] often [, ak′chə lē, akshəlē] adv. as a matter of actual fact; really …   English World dictionary

  • actually — adverb 1 (sentence adverb) spoken used when you are giving an opinion or adding new information to what you have just said: I ve known Barbara for years. Since we were babies, actually. | I do actually think that things have improved. | We had… …   Longman dictionary of contemporary English

  • actually — [[t]æ̱ktʃuəli[/t]] ♦ 1) ADV: ADV before v, ADV group (emphasis) You use actually to indicate that a situation exists or happened, or to emphasize that it is true. One afternoon, I grew bored and actually fell asleep for a few minutes... Interest… …   English dictionary

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